Chocolate Pot de Creme

Chocolate Pot de Creme Absinthe style, serves 4 to 5.

First though, some housekeeping notes. This is my first post under the ‘Koken als een Hombre’ moniker (this means ‘Cook like a Hombre’, but don’t look for any deep meaning in that), where I plan to document and share my utterly amateurish forays into the sheltering realms of cooking and cuisine. At least one person I know bugged me to (re)post recipes some time ago, so I hope I’m not needlessly oversharing these futile attempts at savory enlightenment.

Note that I plan to use metric units for quantities such as volume, weight and temperature. Get used to it – most of the world started doing so after the French Revolution. Also note that I used the word ‘plan’ in the previous sentence; a good engineer is a lazy engineer, one of my old professors said. I don’t know if the same holds for cooks, and perhaps this professor just told that to justify his career or lack thereof, but I’m not going to promise to be consistent with units – there are always calculators, Google and a gazillion of mobile apps to translate things. Finally, everything I write here may be completely wrong or go utterly against standard practice, but rest assured that everything I’ll post is featuring something I tried out, ate and lived to tell; so at least it won’t be lethal.

Now back to business. If you’re familiar with Brasserie Absinthe in San Francisco, you may know there is one item on their dessert menu that has been there since the beginning of time. Yes, none other than their fabulous Chocolate pot de creme – first made with Scharffenberger, then TCHO and now Valrhona chocolate. I used to look for and find excuses to go there just to savor this heavenly dessert; at some point I took on a mission to reproduce it myself, and the simple recipe below is where this mission took me – when the stars align and I get everything right, it comes pretty damn close. Note that a pot de creme is not a mousse, and this pot is deliciously rich. If you crave large amounts of it (and you just may) I recommend pairing it with some hard mountain bike rides.

Chocolate pot de creme

Ingredients:

  1. 250 g dark chocolate – as dark/bitter as possible (but no unsweetened baking chocolate unless you want to add/meter extra sugar); 82% Scharffenberger used to be a good pick, but there are plenty other options.
  2. 150 ml (whipping) cream
  3. a little bit of butter
  4. 3 eggs
  5. a little bit of salt
  6. half a (soup)spoon of sugar
  7. a little bit of cacao
  8. optional: some liqueur

Procedure:

  1. Melt all the chocolate, using a bain marie (i.e. put it in a pot which goes Babushka-style in another pot of hot/heated water)
  2. Use a large container or dish to put the cream in, add the butter, beat it up somewhat and stir
  3. Add the egg yolks to the cream and add a little bit of salt – keep the egg white in a separate container
  4. Beat up the cream-yolk mixture, stir
  5. When the chocolate is completely molten, get it away from the heat source and let it cool down
  6. After the chocolate is sufficiently cooled down (you could measure and experiment with the temperature here), pour it onto the cream-yolk mixture
  7. Stir the mixture – add the cacao (also some amount of liqueur might be added at this stage – absinthe would be an appropriate pick)
  8. Put the sugar into the egg white and beat it up (modestly)
  9. Pour the beaten egg white onto the chocolate mixture, mix and stir until it ‘sets’ into a homogeneous looking blend
  10. Pour the blend in smaller containers (e.g. cups or small dishes)
  11. Put them covered in the fridge and let them sit there for a couple of hours
  12. Serve with some additional whipped cream on top (blend in some vanilla and call it creme chantilly) and/or chocolate shavings

Best served in small ramekins as shown in the photo above, but you could also do a family pack style serving, shown below. Note: due to the presence of uncooked eggs, it’s best to not let it linger around for too long.

201101221529


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.
Overname van foto's en teksten toegestaan mits bronvermelding.